What is Mindfulness?

What is Mindfulness?
What is Mindfulness?

Mindfulness is the psychological process of bringing one’s attention to experiences occurring in the present moment.


 which one can develop through the practice of meditation and through other training. Mindfulness is derived from sati, a significant element of Buddhist traditions, and based on Zen, Vipassanā, and Tibetan meditation techniques.

Clinical psychology and psychiatry since the 1970s have developed a number of therapeutic applications based on mindfulness for helping people experiencing a variety of psychological conditions. Mindfulness practice has been employed to reduce symptoms of depression, to reduce stress, anxiety, and in the treatment of drug addiction.

Clinical studies have documented both the physical- and mental health benefits of mindfulness in different patient categories as well as in healthy adults and children. Research studies have consistently shown a positive relationship between trait mindfulness and psychological health.

Mindfulness practice involves the process

of developing the skill of bringing

one’s attention to whatever is happening in 

the present moment.


Watching the breath, body-scan, and other techniques:


There are several exercises designed to develop mindfulness meditation, which is aided by guided meditations “to get the hang of it.”

  1.     One method is to sit on a straight-backed chair or sit cross-legged on the floor or a cushion, close one’s eyes and bring attention to either the sensations of breathing in the proximity of one’s nostrils or to the movements of the abdomen when breathing in and out. In this meditation practice, one does not try to control one’s breathing, but attempts to simply be aware of one’s natural breathing process/rhythm. When engaged in this practice, the mind will often run off to other thoughts and associations, and if this happens, one passively notices that the mind has wandered, and in an accepting, non-judgmental way, returns to focusing on breathing.

    2. In body-scan meditation the attention is directed at various areas of the body and noting body sensations that happen in the present moment.

    3. One could also focus on sounds, sensations, thoughts, feelings and actions that happen in the present. In this regard, a famous exercise, introduced by Kabat-Zinn in his MBSR program, is the mindful tasting of a raisin, in which a raisin is being tasted and eaten mindfully.
Other approaches include engaging in yoga practices, while attending to movements and body sensations, and walking meditation.



HEALTH DISCLAIMER

This blog provides general information and discussions about health and related subjects. The information and other content provided in this blog, or in any linked materials, are not intended and should not be construed as medical advice, nor is the information a substitute for professional medical expertise or treatment. If you or any other person has a medical concern, you should consult with your health care provider or seek other professional medical treatment. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something that has read on this blog or in any linked materials. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or emergency services immediately.

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